September 25th Mercer Island Farmers Market Event News

The Mercer Island Farmers Market volunteers have organized music and a few educational events for this Sunday’s farmer market. In addition to these activities from the MIFM, we are so pleased that two other groups—the City of Mercer Island and IslandVision—have organized events this Sunday around the farmers market.

Sampling Table: Apples

Organic Gala apples from Tonnemaker Family Orchard at the Mercer Island Farmers Market on September 18, 2011. (Photo by Joel Wachs)

Organic Gala apples from Tonnemaker Family Orchard at the Mercer Island Farmers Market on September 18, 2011. (Photo by Joel Wachs)

The MIFM’s Events Team volunteers are planning another sampling table for this Sunday. From 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., they will be sampling various apples from our farmers.

The MI Farmers Market has an embarrassment of apple riches with dozens of varieties now being brought to market by our farmers: Akane; Gala; Golden Supreme; Ginger Gala; Honey Crisp; Jonamac; McIntosh; Mollie’s Delicious; Prima; Sugar Crisp… This will be a great opportunity for our community to try many of these and learn about their different colors, tastes, textures, and uses.

Music: Garrett and Westcott

This Sunday’s music at the market will be by Seattle-based, accoustic duo Garrett and Westcott.

Children’s Table: Amazing Squashes

Organic Delcato, pumpkin, and acorn squashes at the Five Acre Farm booth at the Mercer Island Farmers Market on September 18, 2011. (Photo by Joel Wachs)

Organic Delcato, pumpkin, and acorn squashes at the Five Acre Farm booth at the Mercer Island Farmers Market on September 18, 2011. (Photo by Joel Wachs)

Mercer Island preschool teacher, Judy Witmer has planned another Sunday of fun and educational activities at the kid’s table. She always finds great hands-on ways for our community’s children to learn about gardening, farming, and the environment.

This week’s theme is “Amazing Squashes.” So while the kids are learning about these fruits at the children’s table, be sure to check out the great squashes now appearing at our farmers’ booths.

Master Gardeners

Gordon Polson of the King County Master Gardeners answering a gardening question from a Mercer Islander at the Mercer Island Farmers Market on June 12, 2011. (Photo by Joel Wachs)

Gordon Polson of the King County Master Gardeners answering a gardening question from a Mercer Islander at the Mercer Island Farmers Market on June 12, 2011. (Photo by Joel Wachs)

As on previous Market Sundays, the Master Gardeners will be available at the MI Farmers Market to answer your gardening and lawn-care questions.

IslandVision Fall Community Picnic

IslandVision, a Mercer Island organization dedicated to creating a more sustainable community, is planning to hold their Fall Community Picnic on Sunday. From noon to 3 p.m., they will be at the Train Playground in Mercerdale Park. IslandVision was instrumental in helping start and run the Mercer Island Farmers Market in its early years.

The group encourages everyone to come down to meet its board and members. They are interested in hearing the community’s ideas for new IslandVision activities and events.

City of Mercer Island: Native Tree Distribution

As part of the City of Mercer Island‘s efforts to encourage the planting of native trees, the City will be distributing trees at the Mercer Island Farmers Market this Sunday, September 25th, as well as on Sunday, October 2nd and Sunday, October 9th.

The trees are available to any Mercer Island resident at an expected cost of $5.00 per tree. The types of trees that will be available are Vine maple, Western red cedar (two-gallon size), and Mountain hemlock. This program is supported with funding assistance from the King Conversation District.

Trees play an important role not only in maintaining our Island’s natural beauty, but also in our environment by:

  • Reducing our carbon footprint by sequestering carbon in trees. Trees, especially large conifers like Western red cedar, remove the greenhouse gas CO2 from the atmosphere during photosynthesis;
  • Reducing stormwater runoff. Mature trees can hold up to 100 gallons of water during storms; and
  • Increasing wildlife habitat, especially when done in conjunction with the removal of invasive species such as ivy and blackberry.
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